History Lessons in Mining and Early Western Life

We attempted to go to the statue Our Lady of the Rockies, a bright white marble statue of Jesus’ mother, Mary, that stands watch over the vast Berkley Pit, but the only way to get there is to take a tour, so we opted to do something else. In Butte and Anaconda are known for their part in mining, especially copper. They’ve memorialized the mining industry in many ways around the town. There are smelter stacks, headframes above old mine shafts, crucibles, statues, and memorials all around the area. Eric, Joe, Ethan and I all went to the first ever smelter location (which failed, but still standing) and did an old serious-faced style picture.

To learn about more of the history of the area, we went to the largest history museum in the US, the World Museum of Mining, in Butte, MT. They recreated some of the town’s buildings and on some of them, put information about the people who lived and worked in them.

The Orhan Girl Mine shaft is still standing today and it was possible to walk around and touch the items used during mining. It was a pretty cool museum, but I did have ideas for what I believe would be improvements.

On the way back from the museum, we got hungry and tried Taco John’s for the first time. It was ok, but a friend told me I ordered incorrectly, so we’ll have to try it again.

We picnicked at the park and played on the playground. They had THE most fun swing EVER there. It was like a seesaw. They were slippery and SO much fun!! Gabe was making Jill squeal!